Protection for Sage Grouse Could Jeopardize Training Facilities House Committee Says

first_imgLanguage in the House version of the fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill would bar the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from increasing federal protection for the greater sage grouse, over concerns that listing the grassland bird as threatened or endangered would restrict the use of military training grounds and firing ranges in the western United States.A decision by the wildlife service to list the greater sage grouse likely would restrict military access to training grounds and firing ranges, reduce the number of exercises and limit the number of overflights and ground movements, the Army and Air Force has said, reported Stars and Stripes.The grouse’s habitat encompasses parts of 11 western states. Energy development and other activities threaten the black and brown bird by reducing the sagebrush it relies on for cover.Grouse inhabit the 327,000-acre Yakima Training Center in Washington and Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, according to the Army. The Air Force said training activity in the 100,000-acre Saylor Creek bombing and training range and the Utah Test and Training Range west of Salt Lake City could be curtailed.“Listing the sage-grouse could have serious repercussions for many critical DOD training facilities in the western United States. We should not further threaten our military’s readiness when it is already in such a precarious state,” Rep. Rob Wittman (R-Va.), chairman of the Armed Services’ Readiness Subcommittee, told the publication.The wildlife service now is under a court order to make a listing decision on the greater sage grouse by Sept. 30 in a legal battle with conservationists that spans more than 15 years.An Interior Department spokeswoman said the agency is working with DOD on grouse preservation. The Endangered Species Act allows the secretary of defense to obtain an exemption from the law’s requirements if necessary for national security, she said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday January 3 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, January 3, 2019:#1) Pints & Pages At Pancho’s CantinaThe Wilmington Memorial Library is hosting its monthly Pints & Pages (social book club for 20 and 30-year-olds) meeting at 7pm at Pancho’s Cantina. Instead of discussing a particular book this month, meet up to share your latest favorite reads, watches & listens! Plus get great recommendations from others. Bring along at least two (books, movies, series, podcasts, etc.) to share! If you don’t have it in hand, that’s okay! Just remember the title. Register HERE.#2) Board Game Design For Teens At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a Board Game Design workshop for teens. Have an idea for your own board game? Bring it to life! Over the course of six sessions, you will come to understand the process from start to finish through instruction by a professional board game designer, while you work on your projects at home. Space is limited. Grades 7-12. Registration is full, but there is a waiting list HERE.#3) Lego Building At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Lego Building session from 3:45pm to 4:45pm. Build a unique LEGO creation.  For Kindergarten & up! No registration required.#4) Drop-In Meditation At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a meditation class at 12:30pm. Join technology librarian Brad McKenna for his weekly drop-in meditation sessions. It will be a mixture of silent and guided meditations. The Insight Timer app will be used so you can continue your practice at home. No registration required.#5) Wilmington Recreation Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, September 5, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, July 11, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Texas DACA Recipients Welcome Supreme Court Decision But Want A Permanent Solution

first_imgCraig Hartley for Houston Public MediaCésar Espinosa (right), founder and executive director of FIEL Houston, supports that DACA recipients continue applying to renew their permits, both the one that grants them the DACA recipient status, as well as the one that authorizes them to work legally in the United States.DACA recipients from Texas reacted positively on Tuesday to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to take a case that could have meant the definitive termination of the program, but noted what they really want is a permanent solution for the uncertain situation of so-called ‘dreamers’ in the form of legislation, an idea they have repeated for months, particularly since President Donald Trump announced back in September that his Administration would end the Obama-era program.DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and is a program former President Barack Obama created in 2012.Julieta Garibay, Texas director and co-founder at United We Dream (UWD), expressed her satisfaction with the Supreme Court’s decision in an emailed statement in the sense it “allows immigrant youth who have had DACA or currently have DACA status that is expiring more time to renew.”However, while noting the decision “is a relief for some in our community,” Garibay’s statement added that “it is not the permanent solution that we fighting for and that immigrant youth deserve.”Óscar Hernández, a member of UWD who lives in Houston and who is a DACA recipient, agreed with Garibay.“I know that our community needs a permanent solution for this situation. So, knowing that DACA is available, it makes me happy that those of us who have it can continue to renew,” said Hernández, but he added: “I also know that there is hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants who have not been able to apply who would benefit from it and who cannot apply for the first time now. So, it’s still very concerning about what’s gonna happen to the rest of the community.”Hernández was actually a little bit skeptic about to what extent the Supreme Court decision is fully beneficial for the so-called ‘dreamers’. “I don’t know how this is going to affect us moving forward because there is an urgency for there to be a permanent solution to DACA and if they’re gonna continue the process with DACA that might also cause like a bump for us, our fight for this permanent solution, because the [Trump] Administration, like many other people, many Democrats and Republicans, can hide behind “Well, DACA is still available, so why should we solve this problem?” I mean, that’s one of the concerns that I’ve had.”Asked about whether he thinks it is a good idea for DACA recipients to continue applying for renewals of their work permits, Hernández said he thinks it is, among other reasons because the government already has their information inasmuch they had to submit it when they sent their original applications.César Espinosa, founder and executive director of Houston-based Immigrant Families and Students in the Struggle (popularly known as FIEL, by its acronym in Spanish), a group that advocates for a comprehensive immigration reform, agreed with Hernández in the sense DACA recipients should continue trying to renew their work permits –pertaining to both the DACA recipient status and to be authorized to work legally in the United States–, among other reasons, because he doesn’t think immigration authorities would use the personal information they have about DACA recipients to detain them.“One of the things that had been flying around prior to the decisions made by the courts was that our information was gonna be used to track us down and, up and to this point, we have not seen that,” noted Espinosa, who is a DACA recipient himself, who added that “at the end of the day immigration, USCIS, already has our information.”Espinosa agreed with Hernández in the sense that what his organization wants is a permanent solution.“We can’t be relying on what the court says or we can’t be relying on more, more executive orders. We need something permanent that we can rely on so that we can continue to plan our lives on the long term,” stressed the activist, who nevertheless also made clear that FIEL would not be satisfied with legislation that only took care of DACA recipients because their term goal is a comprehensive immigration reform that will provide a relief to a bigger segment of the undocumented community.In the meantime and regardless of the fact DACA is in a legal limbo, the White House still thinks Congress can do something about the program before the theoretical March 5th deadline the Trump Administration had established.“Absolutely he’s encouraging them to get something done,” White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said during her Tuesday press briefing referring to members of Congress. “We’re still hopeful that something happens on this and Congress will actually do its job,” she added.The Harris County Republican Party has the same opinion as the White House.Vlad Davidiuk, the party’s communications director in the county, said they felt “disappointed that the [Supreme] Court decided to continue holding dreamers in limbo with DACA status,” but added they believe that “the intention and feeling of the [Supreme] Court was to give members of Congress time to work together and find a solution to give ‘dreamers’ an opportunity to emerge from the shadows in which they were left by President Obama’s failed policy.”“The situation will be resolved only when Congress can work together and find a solution, rather than relying on court orders or unlawful executive orders,” emphasized Davidiuk, who specified that –at the county level— the party’s opinion on DACA is that it was “a well-intentioned solution that was done in an ill-proposed way by the previous Administration.”Houston Public Media reached out to the Houston-based group Texans for Immigration Reduction and Enforcement, but, at the time of publication of this news report, they had not responded to a request for comment. 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Going Vegetarian in Baltimore and DC

first_imgAs the ideals of healthy diets continue to change, more people are abandoning meat than ever. Vegetarianism and Veganism have origins tracing back centuries, but over time these practices have grown to new proportions. Vegan and Vegetarian restaurants are flourishing nationwide, and the Baltimore/D.C.  area is no exception.  Here are a list of the top vegan and vegetarian restaurants near you.The vegan ribs, rice and kale dish served at the Land of Kush. (Courtesy photo)Land Of Kush –Land Of Kush is innovative and Black-owned. With a menu that features unique twists on popular food like soy BBQ ribs, and vegan chicken drumsticks. Prices are reasonable, and if you can’t make it to the downtown location, delivery is available through Order Up.840 Eutaw St, Baltimore, MD 21201.410-225-5874. NuVegan Café – Located along the infamous Georgia Avenue in Washington D.C., NuVegan offers a large variety of vegan meals, from crab cakes and steak meals to hot and cold sandwiches. Brunch is every Sunday with ordinary breakfast entities made with love and strictly vegan ingredients. Nuvegan also offers soy and almond milk-based smoothies as well as freshly made vegetable juices. If you can’t make it to Georgia Ave or it’s College Park, Md location, NuVegan also hits the streets in their food truck, in which you can get more information on locations on the café’s website.2928 Georgia Ave NW, Washington, DC 20001202-232-1700 Evolve – Located in the heart of northwest Washington D.C., Evolve is a top-notch Black owned Vegan spot for eats and entertainment.  Offering 100 percent Vegan meals that range from soul food to soy fish to deserts, Evolve also features a nightly happy hour and caters events and parties. Affordable prices as well as an intimate atmosphere make Evolve the perfect spot for a quick meal, an after work drink or an evening date.341 Cedar St NW, Washington, D.C. 20012202-882-8999center_img Grind House Juice Bar – Just as the name entails, Grind House specializes in fresh juices and smoothies, and features delicious fruity cleanses to get you through your week. As well as tasty drinks, Grind House features a menu filled with familiar grub with a vegan twist like chicken strips, fish fillet and black bean burgers. This Black-owned business specializes in vegan alternatives served through top-notch customer service.2431 St Paul St, Baltimore, Md. 21218.410-366-2441.last_img read more

Organic bromine compounds—another threat to the ozone layer

first_imgThe ozone layer of the lower stratosphere is an extremely diffuse abundance of O3 that absorbs up to 99 percent of incoming ultraviolet solar radiation, thereby creating the conditions that make known life possible. In the 1970s and 1980s, as scientists reported the dramatic thinning of stratospheric ozone, a regulatory push by governments around the world led to a reduction in the use of chlorofluorocarbons by industry. Nonetheless, other compounds released into the atmosphere have the effect of depleting ozone, though the dynamics are still the subject of study. More information: Maria A. Navarro et al, Airborne measurements of organic bromine compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1511463112 © 2015 Phys.org NASA study shows that common coolants contribute to ozone depletion Until recently, scientists believed that only long-lived compounds like halons, chlorofluorocarbons or bromomethane contributed to global ozone depletion. Inconsistencies in stratospheric observations led researchers to look for another contributor, very short-lived brominated substances (VSLorg). These are generated by ocean biogenic sources with cyclic variabilities that are not well understood. However, activity that increases the production of VSLorg will also tend to accelerate the depletion of atmospheric ozone.Now, a cross-disciplinary collaborative of chemists and atmospheric researchers has reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on their analysis of data collected by NASA’s Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) over the tropical Pacific region during 2013 and 2014. The experiment included measurements of organic bromine substances conducted with the Global Hawk Whole Air Sampler (GWAS). The researchers combined the aircraft observations with a chemistry-climate model in an attempt to quantify the total bromine load in the atmosphere.One surprising finding was the similarity of the amounts of bromine between the Eastern and Western Pacific Ocean, despite their different vertical transport mechanisms into the atmosphere. The study found ~6 parts per thousand to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause, the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere. The differences between the two regions were considered to be scientifically negligible. The authors write, “Based on the CAM-chem simulation results, the overall contribution of VSL substances to total stratospheric bromine, quantified at ~17 km, show 5.81 ppt over the Western Pacific and 6.20 ppt over the Eastern Pacific. These results point out that although the production of Bry seems to be slightly different between the Eastern and Western Pacific, the overall contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine is similar in both regions.” They note that uncertainties remain in the characterization of the overall contribution of VSL substances to total stratospheric bromine because all of the results described by the study are derived from model calculations. However, comparing the results of the NASA sampling activities in 2013 and 2014 to other studies conducted in 1996 and 2006 reveals a global decline in the level of atmospheric methyl bromide; over the same period, halons increased, reaching a maximum between 2004 and 2008, with an ensuing slow decline. The researchers do not believe that this is a long-term trend, though, because patterns of variability have not been established for such compounds in the atmosphere. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Organic bromine compounds—another threat to the ozone layer (2015, November 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-bromine-compoundsanother-threat-ozone-layer.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Scienceslast_img read more