5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday January 3 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, January 3, 2019:#1) Pints & Pages At Pancho’s CantinaThe Wilmington Memorial Library is hosting its monthly Pints & Pages (social book club for 20 and 30-year-olds) meeting at 7pm at Pancho’s Cantina. Instead of discussing a particular book this month, meet up to share your latest favorite reads, watches & listens! Plus get great recommendations from others. Bring along at least two (books, movies, series, podcasts, etc.) to share! If you don’t have it in hand, that’s okay! Just remember the title. Register HERE.#2) Board Game Design For Teens At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a Board Game Design workshop for teens. Have an idea for your own board game? Bring it to life! Over the course of six sessions, you will come to understand the process from start to finish through instruction by a professional board game designer, while you work on your projects at home. Space is limited. Grades 7-12. Registration is full, but there is a waiting list HERE.#3) Lego Building At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Lego Building session from 3:45pm to 4:45pm. Build a unique LEGO creation.  For Kindergarten & up! No registration required.#4) Drop-In Meditation At Wilmington LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is hosting a meditation class at 12:30pm. Join technology librarian Brad McKenna for his weekly drop-in meditation sessions. It will be a mixture of silent and guided meditations. The Insight Timer app will be used so you can continue your practice at home. No registration required.#5) Wilmington Recreation Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, September 5, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday, July 11, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Ssangyong To Debut XLV Concept At Geneva Motor Show Will Rival Ford

first_imgSouth Korean automaker SsangYong is all set to introduce its new XLV concept at the upcoming 2014 Geneva International Motor Show, which is scheduled to be held in March.The XLV concept, a compact SUV measures 4,430mm in length, 1845mm in width, 1,600mm in height  and a wheelbase of 2,600mm. Udner the hood, the car packs 1.6-litre diesel engine with an electric motor which is powered by a lithium-ion battery and the SUV concept is arranged in an innovative 2+2+2+1 arrangement.The car will flaunt SsangYong’s new design philosophy ‘Nature born 3 motion’, which projects ‘rhythmical and dynamic exterior design and is aimed at the smart user who is active and seeks individuality and practicality’.”The XLV is a multi-role B-segment SUV concept, featuring significantly lower CO2 emissions thanks to its mild hybrid system which combines a 1.6 litre diesel engine with an electric motor powered by a lithium-ion battery,” the company said in a press release.American automotive company Ford’s EcoSport has been a huge success across the globe. In India; the EcoSport received overwhelming response since its launch.Under the hood, EcoSport comes with 1.5L petrol, 1.5L diesel and the 1.0L EcoBoost engine. The 1.5L petrol engine is expected to give 112 PS power and 140 Nm torque. It will come in both manual and automatic transmissions. The manual transmission model claims to give a mileage of 15.8 kmpl, while the automatic model is expects to deliver 15.6 kmpl. The revolutionary EcoBoost EcoSport engine churns out a power of 125 PS and 170 Nm torque along with a mileage of 18.9 kmpl.last_img read more

Mobile internet suspended restrictions imposed across Kashmir Valley

first_imgSecurity beefed up in Baramulla of Jammu and Kashmir.IANSRestrictions have been imposed across the Kashmir Valley from early Monday, it was announced in Srinagar. “Government has imposed restrictions under section 144 CrPC in District Srinagar with effect from 1200 Hrs on 5th August 2019 which shall remain in force till further orders.”As per the order, there shall be no movement of public and all educational institutions shall also remain closed. There will be a complete bar on holding any kind of public meetings or rallies during the period of operation of this order. Identity cards of essential services officials will be treated as movement passes wherever required.”However, there is no curfew in place as reported in a section of media,” an official statement said.Political leaders like Congress’ Usman Majid and Communist Party of India-Marxist MLA MY Tarigami said that they have been arrested, while police sources said that former Chief Ministers Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti will be under house arrest.Heavy deployments of local police, along with contingents of paramilitary forces, will fan out so that they are in place when the loudspeaker-mounted police vehicles make the announcement early morning.All universities in the Valley have ordered the cancellation of classwork and exams scheduled on Monday without announcing any future dates for the same.Mobile internet facility was been snapped across the state and sources said that even call facility on cell phones are likely to be cut soon, adding that this was being done to prevent anti-social elements from spreading rumours.All police stations, district and sector magistrates deputed on law and order duties have been provided satellite phones to maintain official communications.Service provider BSNL is offering satellite phones to media persons at Rs one lakh a piece to file stories from the Valley.All available indications suggest the locals have already stocked enough rations, medicines and other essentials to survive any eventuality even if this means remaining indoors for long.All top officers of state police, paramilitary forces and intelligence agencies are supervising the situation to ensure that there is no major law and order problem if any major decision is announced in New Delhi that would alter the constitutional relationship of the state with the rest of the country.Meanwhile, District Magistrates across the Valley, worried about an uncontrolled rush of buyers at petrol pumps, on Sunday imposed restrictions on sales.last_img read more

Muhith angry over calling him exJaPa minister

first_imgAbul Maal Abdul Muhith. File PhotoFinance minister AMA Muhith on Monday threatened to take proper steps if Jatiya Party members call him a former minister of the party again, reports UNB.He came up with the warning while taking part in discussions on the supplementary budget for 2017-18 fiscal in parliament.”I’ll take proper steps,” he said.The Jatiya Party members repeatedly called the finance minister as their former minister in parliament.Jatiya Party MP Selim Uddin on Monday again called him a former minister of Jatiya Party.”I’ve already said (about it) several times, but the Jatiya Party members are not heeding to it…I was neither a Jatiya Party member nor a minister,” an annoyed Muhith told the House.He mentioned that he was the minister of military dictator HM Ershad.”Jatiya Party was not formed at that time, I hope they’ll keep this in mind, if they don’t, I’ll take proper steps against them,” he said.Later while taking part in discussions on the demand notice for supplementary budget, Jatiya Party MP Kazi Firoz Rashid said it was true AMA Muhith was not the minister of Jatiya Party.”Let me assure you, Jatiya Party will never make a knowledgeable person like you a minister in the future, and for that you will not require to go to court,” he quipped.He also said the finance minister is giving protection to bank robbers. “You might go to court for that in the future,” he said.last_img read more

Lost city of Mohenjo Daro

first_imgn this photograph taken on February 9, 2017, Pakistani caretaker at the UNESCO World Heritage archeological site of Mohenjo Daro, Ismail Mugheri, points out a two-story well used to collect drinking water at the site some 425 kms north of Karachi. AFPThe centre of a powerful ancient civilisation, Mohenjo Daro was one of the world’s earliest cities — a Bronze Age metropolis boasting flush toilets and a water and waste system to rival many in modern Pakistan.Some 5,000 years on archaeologists believe the ruins could unlock the secrets of the Indus Valley people, who flourished around 3,000 BC in what is now India and Pakistan before mysteriously disappearing.But they warn, if nothing is done to protect the ruins — already neglected and worn by time — it will fade to dust and obscurity, never taking its rightful place in history.”Everybody knows Egypt, nobody knows Mohenjo Daro, this has to be changed,” says Dr Michael Jansen, a German researcher working at the sun-baked site on the banks of the Indus river in Pakistan’s southern Sindh province.Jansen is at the forefront of a new effort to promote the site internationally while finding ways to protect what is left.In summer temperatures can soar above 46 degrees Celsius (115 Fahrenheit). “There is enormous thermo-stress,” says Jansen, adding that salt from the underground water table is also damaging the ruins.But it’s more than just the weather and time. Pakistan’s bloody fight against militancy has also raised the spectre of destruction by an Islamist group, much like Islamic State destroyed the ruins in Syria’s Palmyra.n this photograph taken on February 9, 2017, Pakistani caretaker at the UNESCO World Heritage archeological site of Mohenjo Daro, Ismail Mugheri, points out a two-story well used to collect drinking water at the site some 425 kms north of Karachi. AFPMost horrifying, however, is the wanton disregard for Mohenjo Daro — or “mound of the dead” — by ordinary citizens.In 2014 police stood atop the main stupa as hundreds of people swarmed the site to, ironically, commemorate Pakistan’s cultural heritage — complete with scaffolding, dancing, fireworks, heavy spotlights and lasers.Sardar Ali Shah, cultural minister in Sindh province, vowed never to let such a thing happen again.”It’s like you are jumping on the bed bed of a 5,000-year-old ailing patient,” he tells AFP.Yet today curious visitors still roam the remains with impunity, many leaving rubbish in the once pristine-streets and wells.’Foreigners are afraid’Jansen and his Friends of Mohenjo Daro society aim to promote the site internationally, with plans to recruit Pakistanis around the world for conferences, seminars and debates.Dr Kaleem Lashari, chief consultant to the Pakistani government over Mohenjo Daro, said they will also digitally archive the Indus script — which has never been deciphered — in hopes that making it accessible will increase the site’s profile.n this photograph taken on February 9, 2017, Pakistani caretaker at the UNESCO World Heritage archeological site of Mohenjo Daro, Ismail Mugheri, points out a two-story well used to collect drinking water at the site some 425 kms north of Karachi. AFPAt the site itself, he said, technical reviews are being held to examine the water logging issue and other ways to shore up the ruins, while exploring new, modern technology that allows researchers to ascertain what lies beneath the surface in the portions of the city not yet excavated.But, Lashari says, perhaps the biggest challenge remains Pakistan’s international image, tarnished by extremism, corruption, poverty, and insecurity.”Foreigners are afraid to visit Pakistan and the site because of the chronic issue of law and order,” he warns.All roads lead to equality?The issues he cites underscore unsettling differences between modern day Pakistan and the civilisation found among the ruins.At their peak during the Bronze Age, the Indus Valley people are believed to have numbered up to five million, with Mohenjo Daro their largest and most advanced settlement.Clay and metallic seals, coins, standardised weighing stones, gold and bronze ornaments, toys and whistles — the bric-a-brac of ancient lives have revealed volumes about thriving Indus trade and commerce.n this photograph taken on February 9, 2017, Pakistani caretaker at the UNESCO World Heritage archeological site of Mohenjo Daro, Ismail Mugheri, points out a two-story well used to collect drinking water at the site some 425 kms north of Karachi. AFPThe layout of the city itself suggests an egalitarian people more concerned with cleanliness than hierarchy, says Dr Jonathan Mark Kenoyer of the University of Wisconsin.”In Mesopotamia, the streets went from the city to the palace … whereas in (Indus) cities all the streets were organised to allow access to the whole city,” he says.Mohenjo Daro had a complex water and waste management system which observers have wryly noted was better than in many parts of Pakistan today.Only a small portion of the site has been excavated properly, but the most important building appears not to have been a palace or a place of worship, but a massive public bath.Houses had tiled bathrooms and their own cylindrical brick wells, sometimes raised to the second floor to allow for a flush system.None of this, however,has yet explained why such a powerful, advanced and flourishing civilisation disappeared so abruptly around 1900 BC.Currently, there is no bid to excavate further among the plans being laid by Lashari and Jansen. “It is actually preserved when it is buried,” explains Harvard University’s Dr Richard Meadow.Despite their access to new technologies, that puts researchers in a quandary, especially as they try to understand what happened to the Indus people. As Jansen says, the “best way to learn information is to excavate”.But mysteries take time to solve: for now, the researchers say, they will settle for ensuring that Mohenjo Daro endures for a few centuries more.last_img read more