Un-sharp Dereck Rodriguez knocked around as Yankees sweep past Giants

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.Dereck Rodriguez took the mound Sunday at Oracle Park with the third-best walk rate in the National League — his 1.61 sits behind Max Scherzer and Madison Bumgarner.But Rodriguez struggled to find the strike zone out of the gate against the Yankees, who worked him for four walks and four earned runs in his three-inning outing. Those four walks tie for the most Rodriguez has allowed in his short career.It was enough …last_img read more

Greening it up in Cape Town

first_imgA tranquil scene in the Company Gardens, situated in the heart of Cape Town next to the parliament precinct. (Image: City of Cape Town) The Green Point stadium in July 2009, with Table Mountain in the background. (Image: City of Cape Town) A selection of the icons that will soon become familiar to everyone using the Cape Town green map. (Image: Green Map System) Janine ErasmusGreen-minded Capetonians and visitors can now rest assured that their living, working and playing impact on the environment will be minimal, thanks to the Cape Town green map.The map is a 2010 Fifa World Cup legacy project initiated by the City of Cape Town as part of its Green Goal 2010 action plan. Green Goal 2010 aims to make the upcoming World Cup as gentle on the environment as possible.The green map joins other projects in one of nine Green Goal target areas, this one set to specifically promote environmental awareness, sustainable lifestyles and environmentally efficient building practices.Projects include an anti-littering and waste recycling campaign, a campaign to encourage drinking of tap water rather than bottled water (as the quality of local tap water is more than sufficient), and green buying for events related to 2010.Plans are underway to include the green map in the 2010 visitors’ and event guides, thereby promoting responsible tourism.And as a 2010 legacy project, the map will endure as a valuable resource for residents, visitors and the commercial sector.Leading the wayLaunched on World Environment Day in June 2009, the green map is currently only available online, but a print version is expected before the end of 2009.Cape Town is one of the few cities on the globe to lie within a national park and according to city management, is therefore perfectly positioned to lead the way on the continent with a green map. Not only is the initiative the first in Africa, but it is also the first to map the city from a green perspective.As one of the world’s most sought-after destinations, Cape Town is bracing itself for a surge of football- and nature-mad tourists over the months of June and July 2010, and beyond. Cape Town is a 2010 host city, and now boasts a state-of-the-art, newly renovated venue – the spectacular Green Point stadium that is scheduled for completion in December 2009.The region is also home to the Cape floral kingdom, the smallest of the world’s six floral kingdoms, but by far the richest. At least 70%, or about 6 200, of the 9 000-plus plant species of the Cape Floral Kingdom are found nowhere else on Earth. There are six endemic species of birds, four of mammals, 22 of reptiles, 16 of amphibians, and 14 of freshwater fish.This unique environment and wealth of biodiversity is one of the city’s greatest assets. The development of the green map aims to help protect that environment by guiding visitors and residents in ways of sustainable living.It also points out the greenest spots in Cape Town and offers an ever-growing directory of green products and services. These include green spaces, alternative energy sites, green accommodation, green markets and eateries, green events, recycling sites and drop-off points, and much more.Global communityCape Town is now part of a worldwide network of 566 similar maps in 55 countries in the Green Map community.One of the project’s outstanding features is that it is powered by the open source Green Map system, which combines a globally accepted set of standard icons with Google’s advanced mapping technology. Users are encouraged to submit their favourite sites for inclusion.The green map’s icon set is divided into three categories – culture and society, sustainable living, and nature. These cover everything from eco-clubs to sources of organic local food to community gardens, bicycle paths, fairtrade companies, green map availability points (for the printed version), amphibian habitats and scenic viewpoints.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesCape Town “best city on the world”Cape Town: a sustainable cityCape Town makes elite listUseful linksCape Town green mapGlobal green map systemGreen Goal – City of Cape TownBiodiversity hotspotslast_img read more

Trust is a triangle – why and how to get it

first_imgMy dad visited this weekend. He’s a psychoanalyst and quite brilliant, so I spent time asking him about some of the issues I’m exploring with Mark Rovner under the topic, “the seven things everyone wants.” My dad had some particularly fascinating comments about trust.I want to share those today because there is a huge demand for trust in our sector, yet a serious supply problem. Holly at NTEN blogged on it just yesterday. She cited a some important data:Want to guess what the number one source of trusted information is for most Americans? People like them — their friends, colleagues and peers. So we trust people like us. That is definitely true. But how does that work? What is trust, really, and how does it come about? That’s what I asked my dad, since he’s spent a lifetime understanding people’s minds.He says trust is a triangle. Person A trusts Person B when Person B authentically represents or speaks to something that matters to us. Think of that thing as “C” – the third point that makes a triangle. For example, a person might trust a politician that stands for their vision of America. A customer of Amazon will trust another customer at Amazon who credibly reviews a book they are considering buying. A person might trust a brand if it consistently stands for quality. A person will trust their spouse if they stand for a faithful marriage. It’s not so much the person on the other side of the relationship as the stakes we share, the point that forms a triangle.Given the power of word-of-mouth marketing, if we’re trying to promote a cause (the “C” of our triangle), we need to ensure that our target audience (“A”) sees a triangle — that they actually care what we stand for — and that the other person in their triangle is not necessarily us but someone very close to them. That creates a strong triangle of trust. We don’t get a triangle if they don’t care what we do or don’t know the person speaking. What does this mean to us? That our triangle requires new points. It’s time to change our message – so we are creating a point of trust that matters to people – and the messenger speaking to that point. We won’t have trust without that kind of shape.last_img read more

How to Convert One-Time or Annual Donors into Monthly Givers

first_imgRevisit the language you’re using in your appeals. Frame your ask in such a way that it’s a win-win situation-monthly donations for you, convenience and budgeting for your donors. (Read more about the four parts of a great fundraising appeal.) Make sure your donation form offers a recurring giving option. Whenever you’re asking for money, ask for the monthly pledge, not just a one-time gift. (Need a donation form that allows and encourages donors to set up monthly giving? Find out more about DonateNow.) Package the appeal in an exciting way. For example, some organizations have an ambassador program or a sponsor-a-child every month program. Put a face on that sustainable gift. This way you’re creating some tangible tie to the idea of giving every month. Remember: To increase charitable donations, you should appeal to the heart–not the head. Thinking about monthly giving is one of the smartest things you can do as a fundraiser. At Network for Good, we find that 30-40% of the online donation volume coming from a nonprofit’s website is monthly giving. It would be wonderful for nonprofits to thank people every month instead of asking them for donations every few weeks.How do you do that? How do you turn your annual givers into monthly supporters? Don’t be afraid to ask for a monthly gift of support after someone completes a one-time transaction. It can be ingrained as a nice thank-you message: “Thank you so much for making a one-time gift. This is how you can put your support to work for us each and every month. Would you consider becoming a monthly supporter?” This can be done when asking for another gift later in the year, but consider this: First-time online donors are more likely to turn into monthly donors within three days their original online gift. Think of using this strategy during the holidays when you’re experiencing high traffic of one-time donations!Source: Adapted from the Nonprofit 911 Presentation “The Experts Are In! Your Online Fundraising and Nonprofit Marketing Questions Answered.”last_img read more

How to Build Relationships and Achieve Fundraising Success in a Web 2.0 World

first_imgPresented October 10, 2008 at the The Technology in the Arts Conference in Pittsburgh. Download the slides [PDF] below.Social networking tools like Facebook, MySpace and blogs were the hot topic of the past year. So are they worth your time?  How can you fundraise successfully with Web 2.0?  Does using the Internet mean getting rid of your offline marketing tactics?Establishing your organization’s brand and presence on the Web, with opportunities for potential donors to learn, blog, question and connect, leads to community-building and, ultimately, long-term giving. Join Jono Smith, director of marketing at Network for Good, to learn how to build affinity for your organization and use your Web presence to turn Web visitors into Web donors.Session attendees will leave with:Practical tips for how (and why) to dive into online fundraisingAn understanding of the new “Web 2.0? model of online communicationsHow and why community-building works for fundraising, and how you can empower your supporters to become champions for your causeWhy Web 2.0 makes community-building easier for youSession Leader:Jono Smith is responsible for marketing Network for Good’s online fundraising services to nonprofit organizations.  Network for Good is a nonprofit organization that helps other nonprofits raise money and reach supporters online.  Network for Good has processed more than $200 million in donations for 30,000 nonprofits since its 2001 founding by AOL, Cisco and Yahoo!.  Prior to joining Network for Good, Jono spent eight years at SunGard Higher Education, where he was responsible for managing the company’s marketing efforts in Europe and the Middle East.  Jono also held marketing and sales positions at SCT and Campus Pipeline, before their acquisitions by SunGard.  Prior to this, Jono served in the Clinton Administration as Special Assistant to the Director of White House Communications.  Jono holds an undergraduate degree in English from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.  In his personal time, Jono has raised over $10,000 for AIDS vaccine research.last_img read more

Twitter Fundraising: Holy Grail or Fail Whale?

first_imgDownload the MP3 audio recording, transcript, free e-book and presentation slides below!Everybody’s talking about Twitter and its potential for online fundraising, but is anyone actually raising money with it? What are the key success factors shared by nonprofits who have used Twitter successfully? Where do nonprofits start on Twitter?This webinar covers how to tell if Twitter is a good fit for your organization and where to find recommended resources, free tools and reading.In this presentation you will:Know how to explain Twitter to your grandmotherMaster the 4 post types – when and how to use themUnderstand the pros and cons of Twitter vs. email and direct mailLearn Twitter campaign management basicsTraining made available in part due to the support of the Surdna Foundationlast_img read more

How to convince your skeptical boss that social media has merit

first_imgskepticism by cbcastor via flickrI am asked almost weekly how to convince nonbelievers in an organization give social networking efforts a try. So I thought I’d answer that question here and as an upcoming guest post on Beth Kanter’s blog, since she’s likely given you many good ideas of how to use social media – and you’ve likely run into internal roadblocks on the road to Web 2.0.1. Change the subject: If you’re having a debate over the value of social media, you’re having the wrong discussion. The discussion should be about your organization’s goals – with web 2.0 being the means, not the end (see #2).2. Make it about what your boss already wants: Don’t position your web 2.0 idea as a social media initiative; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language.3. Make it about the audience: A good way to depersonalize the web 2.0 debate is to make it about your target audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss.4. Sign your boss up to listen: Set up Google Alerts and TweetBeep for your boss, so she or he can see that there are already many discussions about your organization going on online. Once this apparent, two things are likely to happen. First, it will become clear that your organization no longer controls your message online – so worrying about social media causing a lack of control is not worth fearing. That day is already here. Second, it will be hard not to want to join those conversations online – which is what web 2.0 engagement is all about.5. Set some ground rules: Set a social media policy for your organization, so it’s clear how to respond to what you’re hearing – and what types of initiatives have internal support.6. Start clear and small: If you’re going to start an initiative, make it a small one with clear goals so you know how to measure success.7. Report, report, report: Share every little bit of progress and give your boss credit for it!Last – a word of caution. Don’t think you have all the answers. This isn’t a crusade, it’s a learning experience for everyone. You boss’s recalcitrance may be well founded. Make sure there IS a good case for your initiative and if it does fail, share and learn from what went wrong. There is no shame in gaining knowledge from mistakes – for you, or your boss.last_img read more

Flat is the new up: Philanthropy this year

first_imgMy Silver FLATs, by Joey 989 via FlickrIs giving up or down? Lucy Bernholz has the answers here. As she noted, flat may be the new up. (She was quoting a Tweet there.)Read her whole post. The highlights:1. Giving was down in 2008 from 2007 by 2%, the first decline since 1987. This year, a third of nonprofits say their budgets are down, but 1/3 say they’re up, probably due to stimulus dollars.2. Expect more scrutiny of your nonprofit at all levels, thanks to scandals, budget pressures and the new 990.3. The Foundation Center and Guidestar are both projecting 2009 foundation and individual giving to drop between 9-13% each over 2008 and again 2010 over 2009. 4. We don’t know how many nonprofits are going under, but some predict 10% could this year.So if you’re flat, congrats. That’s pretty great in this climate.last_img read more

The ups and downs of transparency – read these posts

first_imgHere are some posts you should be reading. Transparency is a hot topic – the new black, really – so what does this mean? How much is the right amount? For whom? What are the ups and downs of demand for tranparency, which is here to stay.Read:Lucy Bernholz on transparency’s ups and downs.Allison Fine’s reflections on tranparency (be sure to read Lessig’s comment)David Roodman’s thoughts on Kiva in recent weeks amid this tranparency debatelast_img