The amazing success of the Salvation Armys Kettle Campaign

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – This year the goal for the Red Kettle Campaign was set at $65,000 and with the help of our generous community the goal was reached.Cameron Eggie, Executive Director of the Salvation Army Northern Centre of Hope, shares that this was a very successful year for the Red Kettle Campaign and he attributes it to the community awareness. With new locations hosting the Red Kettles this year and new excited Volunteers helping to man the Kettles,  the grand total raised is $65,870! Last year the Campaign raised $47,060 for the Food Bank.“The only way we can have a Food Bank in FSJ is through donated dollars,” says Eggie “While we are partnered with Food Bank B.C. no operational Dollars are available through that membership.” Christmas Eve, the Kettles raised $10,000 alone on that day, a significant contribution towards this year’s goal.“We are very happy how this Campaign turned out,” said Eggie, this will make the difference to ensure those in the Community that require food assistance will be able to receive this help.This year’s new locations hosting the kettle was Gallagher’s Light Display, viewers of the light show generously donated in the total of $5484“We’re just very thankful for the response of the community,” says Eggie “it is affirming that what we are doing is making a difference and that we’re not doing it alone”To view more of the contributors to the Salvation Army’s Christmas programs CLICK HERETo read more about Gallagher’s Light Display CLICK HERElast_img read more

Suncor Energy reports production hits quarterly record in fourth quarter

first_imgIn its outlook, Suncor maintained its December production guidance for 2019 that forecast production growth of 10 percent even after production cuts imposed by the Alberta government.The province announced mandatory production curtailments for the industry this year in a bid to reduce a glut of oil and help boost low prices.Suncor’s full fourth-quarter results will be issued Feb. 5.(THE CANADIAN PRESS) CALGARY, A.B. – Suncor Energy Inc. says its upstream production in the last three months of 2018 hit a quarterly record.Canada’s largest integrated oil and gas company says production averaged 831,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day, up 12 percent from the third quarter.Oilsands operations produced approximately 433,000 barrels per day in the quarter, while total production from exploration and production was 90,000 boe/d.last_img read more

Mogherini Dismisses Euro-Deputy’s Allegations on Human Rights in Morocco

Rabat – High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini has curtly dismissed a Euro-deputy from the group of European United left concerning false allegations on the situation of human rights in Morocco.“The EU keeps a regular contact with the national council of human rights and its regional delegations, and supports the process of democratic reforms in Morocco in conformity with the new constitution,” Mogherini said in her answer to question by Portuguese Euro-deputy, communist João Ferreira.The EU lauded on several occasions Morocco’s commitment to promoting human rights, upholding democracy and the rule of law and reforming the judiciary.Answering another question on the Morocco-EU agriculture agreement, Mogherini said that the agreement is valid from the international point of view, adding that the European court’s decision does not affect agreements concluded with Morocco. With MAP read more

Moroccans Spent MAD 15.7 Billion on Foreign Travel in 2017

Rabat – Moroccan citizens have developed quite the healthy appetite for foreign travel this year. In 2017, Moroccans spent 20 percent more trotting the globe compared to 2016, says Morocco’s Foreign Exchange Office.Year on year, Morocco’s travel expenses are on the rise. During the 11 first months of 2017, foreign travel expenses reached MAD 17.5 billion, compared to MAD 13 billion in 2016, registering a 19.5 percent increase.According to Morocco’s Foreign Exchange Office, this rate is expected to rise even more this December, as many Moroccans prefer to spend their new year’s holidays abroad. Morocco’s travel revenues are also following the same upward trend, with a 6.5 increase from 2016. Rising from MAD 60.3 billion last year to 64.3 billion in 2017, these revenues, while still modest are largely sufficient to absorb the expenses’ increase.According to the Exchange Office, the travel flows’ balance increased by 2.9 percent to MAD 48.5 billion compared to 47.2 billion in 2016.Moroccans favorite foreign destinationsSouthern Europe still leads the list of Moroccans favorite foreign destinations. According to a 2016 study run by travel website Jevoyage.ma, the south of Spain  attracts more than 300,000 Moroccan each summer.France and Italy are also popular, and Portugal has been a favorite destination for some years now. “Close to Morocco, all of these countries have the advantage of accessibility, with frequent flights, in both regular and low-cost flights, which explain their success,” says the site.Organized travel seems to be all the rage right now. Moroccan families prefer “all inclusive” clubs, hotels with aqua parks, entertainment centres and apartments. Couples tend to turn to luxury hotels and young singles “are very price-conscious and are more sensitive to bargains, promotions and deals, especially on the internet,” says the site.Annually, in number of travelers, Morocco remains the preferred destination of Moroccan tourists with 54 percent. The kingdom is followed by Turkey with 10 percent, accessible without a visa. Spain comes in third place with 8 percent, followed by France, Italy and Thailand each with 5 percent, Portugal with 4 percent, and finally the United Arab Emirates with 3 percent.In terms of annual growth, Mexico experienced a boom in 2016 with a 77 percent increase, followed by Vietnam with 64 percent, Portugal with 42 percent, and Italy with 28 percent.“The search for a change of scenery becomes a significant feature of the Moroccan traveler, as evidenced by the rise of far-flung destinations such as Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and Bali,” the website added.Another type of destination that is gaining more popularity with Moroccan travelers are countries accessible without visas, like Turkey. “56 in total, they include a large number of African destinations, including Côte d’Ivoire, Cape Verde, Comores, Gabon and Madagascar,” but also countries in the Middle East such as Lebanon or Jordan. read more

Reports that displaced youth are abused and exploited in Colombias cities concern

“We are very concerned about reports of violence and intimidation against young internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Colombia’s cities,” Jennifer Pagonis, a spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), said in Geneva. She cited information received from agencies working with displaced persons in Colombia who continue to report selective murders, extortion, sexual violence, loan-sharking and forced recruitment into armed groups or prostitution rings.She said the agency was concerned that, as a result of the violence and intimidation by irregular armed groups in some urban areas, IDPs were becoming displaced for a second and even a third time. There are over 1.5 million registered IDPs in Colombia, although estimates of the total number range between 2 million and 3.5 million. Of the estimated 1 million IDPs living in the largest cities, some 400,000 are teenagers and young people under 29.“It is very important that we continue to work with the authorities and civil society to ensure that IDPs, particularly young people, receive the protection and assistance they deserve – thus avoiding a situation in which they become easy prey for criminal gangs or irregular armed groups,” said Ms. Pagonis, adding that policies to guarantee their access to school prevent their recruitment by these groups and ensure their physical safety are urgently needed.According to UNHCR, in some city areas armed groups are known to have imposed curfews and banned behaviour they disapprove of such as body piercing and short dresses in women and long hair in men. People who disobey these orders risk violent death. The latest example of this type of violence was the killing by unknown armed men on 11 May of at least two boys, aged 14 and 16, in Altos de Cazuca, an area in the outskirts of the Colombian capital, Bogotá, which is home to more than 20,000 IDPs.After that incident, up to seven other young men were reported missing in the same area. According to local witnesses, the reason for these killings and forced disappearances was disobeying the curfew imposed by an irregular armed group operating in the area.Young IDPs are also exposed to other threats. According to a recent study, only one in eight IDP student have returned to school after having been displaced. IDP girls are more vulnerable to sexual exploitation and teenage pregnancy than other teenagers. UNHCR says that 30 per cent of IDP women under 20 have at least one child, compared to 19 per cent among non-internally displaced women. read more

East meets west at YYC with inaugural cargo flight from Hong Kong

East meets west at YYC with inaugural cargo flight from Hong Kong The white Stetsons were out at the Calgary International Airport to welcome international airline Cathay Pacific’s new flight path from Hong Kong. The Boeing 747-8 freighter touched down on the tarmac in Calgary shortly before 9 a.m. Saturday amid the fanfare of a warm western welcome set up by the airport authority. The flight will go twice-weekly in what the has been called a step forward in strengthening the airline’s presence in Canada. by News Staff Posted Oct 18, 2014 10:30 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Major stock indices flat ahead of major central bankers conference

by The Canadian Press Posted Aug 21, 2017 9:34 am MDT Last Updated Aug 21, 2017 at 3:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Major stock indices flat ahead of major central bankers conference TORONTO – North American stock indices capped off Monday on a muted tone as investors await signals from an upcoming major central bankers conference scheduled to begin later this week.On Bay Street, the Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index inched down 0.45 of a point to 14,951.88.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average rose 29.24 points to 21,703.75 while the S&P 500 index advanced 2.82 points to 2,428.37. The Nasdaq composite index shed 3.40 points to 6,213.13.Canadian markets strategist Craig Fehr says he expects markets to stay relatively flat ahead of a gathering Thursday in Jackson Hole, Wyo., where central bankers, economists and policy makers will meet. The annual conference, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, ends on Sat., Aug. 26.“I think investors are taking a little bit of a pause ahead of that meeting,” said Fehr, who works at Edward Jones in St. Louis.“In the absence of a major headline or a major piece of data, it is likely to be a bit of a wait-and-see approach until we get more clarity out of Jackson Hole.”Investors will be looking for information on the plan and timeline for various central banks, especially the U.S. Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank, to withdraw some of their stimulus, Fehr said.Elsewhere in currency markets, the Canadian dollar continued its advance for a fourth consecutive day, trading at an average price of 79.52 cents US, up 0.07 of a U.S. cent. It has risen 1.12 of a U.S. cent since last Tuesday’s daily average price of 78.40 cents US.In commodities, the October crude contract lost $1.13 to US$47.53 per barrel and the September natural gas contract gained 6.9 cents to US$2.96 per mmBTU.The December gold contract moved ahead $5.10 to US$1,296.70 an ounce and the September copper contract advanced 4.1 cents to US$2.98 a pound.By Aleksandra Sagan in Vancouver.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter. read more

Connected autonomous vehicles will improve quality of life for 6 in 10

Six in 10 people say connected and autonomous vehicles will improve their quality of life, finds new study.Stress-free driving seen as the biggest benefit, with cars that brake and park themselves top attractions.Half of young people would use a connected and autonomous car today if they could.Connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) will transform the lives of six out of every 10 people in the UK, according to new research published by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders. Connected and Autonomous Vehicles: Revolutionising Mobility in Society,1 the first comprehensive UK-based study of the human impact of CAVs, canvassed the views of more than 3,600 respondents and found that this new technology will offer freedom to some of society’s most disadvantaged, including those with disabilities, older people and the young. The research, conducted with Strategy&, PwC’s strategy consulting arm, shows CAVs have the potential to reduce social exclusion significantly. Six out of 10 (57%) people surveyed said this new technology would improve their quality of life. For young people, the impact could be even greater, with 71% of those aged 17 to 24 believing their lives would be improved. Consumers are increasingly seeing the benefits of CAVs, with 56% feeling positive about them. Young people were most excited, with almost half (49%) saying they would get into a CAV today if one were available.Automatic braking and parking and the car’s ability to self-diagnose faults were cited as features most likely to reduce stress – the biggest attraction of owning a CAV among all groups. Freedom to travel spontaneously and socialise with friends and family were also seen as life-changing benefits, with 88% of people who believe CAVs will improve their social life saying a CAV would help them get out of the house more regularly.People with mobility-related disabilities are among those set to benefit the most, with almost half (49%) saying a CAV would allow them to pursue hobbies outside of home or go out to restaurants more often (46%). Meanwhile, two fifths (39%) said they would benefit from having better access to healthcare. Adults in this group are nearly three times as likely as the rest of the population to lack a formal qualification, and are less likely to be in paid employment.2 With car ownership lower in this group than the average population, CAVs offer the potential to access education and better paid jobs. In fact, Strategy& calculates that CAVs have the potential to give one million more people access to further education, enabling them to increase their earning potential by an estimated average of £8,509 per year.Older people are also set to benefit, with almost a third having problems walking or using a bus,3 and many unable to drive due to ill-health, poor eyesight or prohibitive insurance, making a strong case for self-driving cars. 47% of survey respondents said a CAV would make it easier for them to fulfil basic day-to-day tasks such as grocery shopping, while 45% looked forward to pursuing more cultural activities such as visiting museums or going to concerts or football matches.Mobility is also a challenge for many young people with more than a quarter (29%) saying the cost of car ownership, particularly high insurance premiums, restricts their freedom. All groups cited the frequency of public transport as a barrier. More than two in five (43%) also cited the high cost and infrequency of public transport (33%) as a restriction. The potential for saving money, therefore, was highlighted as a key benefit of connected and autonomous vehicles.Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, saidThe benefits of connected and autonomous vehicles are life-changing, offering more people greater independence, freedom to socialise, work and earn more, and access services more easily. While fully autonomous cars will be a step change for society, this report shows people are already seeing their benefits. The challenge now is to create the conditions that will allow this technology to thrive, given how it will deliver wider societal advantages.Mark Couttie, Strategy& partner, said,There is a real risk that this momentum and competitor advantage in the UK will stall if we don’t do more to create positive public perception, overcoming our inherent risk averse culture. Expanding people’s horizons about the advantages of fully autonomous cars is a vital first step. This means better communicating the art of the possible to increase social acceptance and dispel concerns that our survey identified relating to cost and safety. Significant investment must also be made to improve the connectivity infrastructure across the UK road network and this report provides a number of clear recommendations to ensure that we capitalise on this window of opportunity.Although fully connected and autonomous vehicles aren’t expected to become mainstream until 2030, most new cars are now connected via sat nav or Bluetooth, and more than half are available with safety systems such as collision warning or autonomous emergency braking. The UK is also fast establishing itself as a centre of excellence for this exciting new technology, with billions of pounds of investment already delivering public trials of autonomous driving and testing of prototype vehicles by car makers on UK roads.SMMT has already identified a £51 billion economic opportunity to the UK, as well as the potential to prevent some 25,000 road accidents and save 2,500 lives.4 This new research suggests that the potential of CAVs to get more people into education, work, and enabling them to more freely access healthcare, amenities and leisure activities, could deliver a further economic boost.Notes1 Connected and Autonomous Vehicles: Revolutionising Mobility in Society, March 2017, Strategy&, includes findings from a survey of 3,641 UK consumers aged between 17 and 65+ conducted between 2 and 17 March 2017. The sample included 1,000+ respondents in each of the demographics: people aged 17-24, people aged 65+, and adults aged 17 and above with disabilities.2 Office for Disability Issues, 2012, Measuring National Well-Being – Education and Skills; The Poverty Site, 2014, Key Facts3 DFT National Transport Survey 20144 Connected and Autonomous Vehicles – The UK Economic Opportunity, March 2015, KPMGClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

Cairns family gift will have 10million impact on research complex

Roy Cairns speaks during the announcement of his donation to the new health and bioscience research complex.It was standing room only on the fourth floor of the Plaza Building today as a transformational gift worth $10 million was announced for the Niagara Health and Bioscience Research Complex.The Cairns family, led by patriarch Roy Cairns, announced its donation to what will now be known as the Cairns Family Health and Bioscience Complex. The philanthropy, given over several years, will cumulatively result in a $10 million gift to the university.Roy Cairns made the announcement with his son Jeff, a Brock graduate and supporter. The elder Cairns is a long-time builder and friend of Brock, and one of the early supporters of its establishment.“I have enjoyed every minute of helping Brock, and will continue to help Brock,” Cairns said during the announcement.New small businesses in various fields will come to Niagara to be part of what the bioscience complex produces, he said.“These businesses will change the face of the Niagara Region as we’ve previously known it.”Cairns, a prolific Niagara philanthropist, is a founding partner in the St. Catharines law firm Chown Cairns and life member of the Law Society of Upper Canada. He is chairman and major shareholder of Charlesway Corporation Ltd. and has been, and continues to be, a director of several publicly-traded and closely-held private corporations.He contributed to the Brock University Founding Fund, and was a member of the team that made the lead gift to build Taro Hall. The Roy Cairns Scholarship benefits a first-year student in the Oenology and Viticulture program.Brock will do its part to uphold the legacy, President Jack Lightstone said.“Make no mistake, generations of individuals and families in our community will have more opportunities, and will be collectively better off, because of the vision and the generosity of the Cairns family.”Projected to be complete by 2012, the complex will be a 176,530-square-foot, $111.4-million facility that will provide support for four Canada Research Chairs and several award-winning researchers in biotechnology, green chemistry, plant pathology and health and wellness.The Cairns family poses in front of the sign for the newly renamed research complex. From left are Roy, John, Kitty and Jeff Cairns. read more

Caribbean can reach treatment targets to end AIDS if it accelerates

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedHealth Minister says over 8000 Guyanese living with HIV/AIDS – Guyana set to participate in UN High Level Meeting to end AIDSMay 26, 2016In “Health”UN report underscores ‘critical importance’ of scaling up HIV testing in regionNovember 24, 2018In “Regional”Op-Ed: World AIDS DayNovember 30, 2018In “Health” UNAIDS has released its annual flagship report, showing that the Caribbean could reach the testing and treatment targets that will put it on course to end its AIDS epidemic if it accelerates its response.UNAIDS Regional Support Team Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, Dr. César NúñezAccording to Ending AIDS: progress towards the 90-90-90 targets, in order to speed up progress the region must improve strategies to ensure more people living with HIV are diagnosed and that there are higher levels of viral suppression among those on treatment.“The region has achieved remarkable progress in expanding HIV services,” said UNAIDS Regional Support Team Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, Dr. César Núñez. “We need to continue work to ensure that we leave no one behind.”The report gives detailed analysis of progress and challenges toward achieving the benchmarks set to help the world achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030.These targets are for 90% of all people living with HIV to know their status, 90% of diagnosed people to access sustained antiretroviral treatment and 90% of all people accessing treatment to achieve viral suppression by 2020.Caribbean on track to reach treatment coverage targetThe Caribbean has achieved strong progress related to getting people living with HIV on treatment and reducing deaths due to AIDS, but gaps remain. In the region four of five (81%) people living with HIV who know their status are accessing antiretroviral therapy.This means the region as a whole is doing a fairly good job at starting people on treatment following diagnosis. Haiti is the only country in the region to have achieved the second target–at least 90% of diagnosed people on treatment.HIV treatment coverage has contributed to a  52% decline in AIDS-related deaths in the Caribbean over the last decade. Another positive note is that the scale has tipped and more than half of all people (52%)  living with HIV in the region are on antiretroviral therapy. However, there is still a significant proportion of people (48%) not yet accessing treatment.Region lagging behind on testing and viral suppressionOf concern is the fact that the region is lagging behind on HIV testing and viral suppression. Progress must be accelerated for the Caribbean to achieve the 90-90-90 targets that will set it on course to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030.One-third of people (36%) living with HIV in the Caribbean are not aware of their HIV status. Community-centred strategies are urgently needed to reach those who have not yet been diagnosed.The Caribbean must also improve efforts to keep people in care once they’ve started treatment and to ensure that treatment is successful. Only about half of people accessing antiretroviral therapy in the Caribbean had access to routine viral load testing.In 2016 one-third (33%) of those on treatment were not virally suppressed. (“Viral suppression” means that people living with HIV have been treated to lower the level of HIV in their blood to undetectable levels.This protects their health while preventing transmission of the virus). Notably, several countries are getting closer to reaching the target. Three of four people on treatment achieved viral suppression in Barbados, Dominica, Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago.Dr. Nunez emphasized that “community health workers and civil society are critical to securing early HIV diagnosis and successful treatment”. The report called for greater community involvement in Caribbean health-care provision in order to reach the 90-90-90 targets. read more

Interested in acquiring the assets of Port Kembla Copper

first_imgWith less than two months left before the scheduled start of demolition in August 2009, P.I. International is offering a last chance opportunity to purchase some or all of the assets of Port Kembla Copper (PKC) – including bulk handling equipment, two anode furnaces and anode casting equipment. At www.pkcassets.com you can download equipment lists, presentations, and see more details of the equipment including a few videos. Ron Pariani of P.I. International notes “we have been advised that once demolition starts, access to the site will be limited and the priority will be the remediation of the site. There will not be access for safe non-destructive removal of valuable process equipment.” The PKC process consists of five key process areas:Concentrate receiving and handlingPrimary smelting furnacesSecondary smelting furnacesAcid plantRefineryWaste water treatment plant.last_img read more

Kadetten youthstar out 68 months

Christian Dissinger, one of the best young prospects, currently playing for Kadetten, will have to sit outside the field for 6-8 months, because of heavy injury on his left knee, which he got during the Champions League game against Barcelona at home. This is heavy blow for him personally, as he was playing better and better every game and his future was very bright, but not he’ll have to make a break from handball, and we can only wish him to heal fast and to see him again soon on the court. ← Previous Story Banja Luka and Sabac awaken – Almost 11.000 people watched SEHA Round 4 Next Story → Champions League Round 2 Review: Big Surprises! read more

Alleged murderer of young woman in Rhodes assaulted in prison

first_imgOne of the two people charged with the murder of the young college student in Rhodes suffered a brutal assault at the Avlona prison, where he is detained, waiting for trial.The incident was caught on video, apparently from a mobile phone, which surfaced online and made the rounds on many Greek news outlets.The grainy footage shows a group of inmates verbally attacking and humiliatibg the alleged rapist and murderer, asking him to remove his clothes before proceeding to punch and kick him. The 19-year-old man is heard saying “I didn’t do it, it was the other guy”, referring to his co-defendant, who is detained elsewhere. Another inmate is heard to call for his pants to be removed.The young man was transferred to the Evangelismos hospital, where he was treated for minor injuries. He claimed that he lost consciousness while he was being hit, and when he regained his senses, he found himself without clothes. He claimed that he was raped, something that, according to the Proto Thema website, was confirmed by the medical report. Speaking to a Greek TV station, an inmate who claimed to be one of the assailants, said that there were seven of them, armed with knives that they fabricated out of iron scraps.Subsequently, the 19-year-old was transferred to a different facility, where he will remain until his trial for the rape and murder of Eleni Topaloudi in Didymotiho.An urgent investigation was ordered by the justice ministry into the circumstances of the assault, given that the defendant was held in solitary confinement, to be kept apart from the general population. The investigation will also determine how the assailants took hold of a cell phone, a forbidden item in Greek correctional facilities.Responding to the video, Yannis Topaloudis, the murdered student’s father, spoke to the Greek media to condemn the assault and express his support to the alleged murderer’s parents. The Topaloudis family’s lawyer, Alexis Kougias, issued a statement saying it was unacceptable “for a democratic country such as Greece, for the Lynch law to exist.” Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Camas looks to fill city council position

first_imgWhen Camas city councilors appointed Shannon Turk as mayor, it opened up a spot on the council.City officials are now looking to fill the open council seat, and applications are due by Jan. 11.To be eligible for the seat, applicants must have continuously resided in Camas city limits for at least one year prior to appointment to council, must be a registered voter in Camas and must reside in Ward 3, where the opening exists. Ward 3 sits partially between Highway 14 and N.W. 38th Ave. For the full map of Ward 3 and all wards in the city, visit www.cityofcamas.us/wardinfo.The application asks for a resume and cover letter in which applicants have to answer a few questions, such as why they want to serve and what experiences would they bring to the council.Another prompt states: “Camas, like many Washington cities, is facing a structural deficit, where expenses grow faster than revenues, due to property tax limitation measures. Explain your views on how the city of Camas should address these budgetary difficulties. Specifically, discuss actions you might encourage to balance revenues and expenditures and the impacts of city services.”Applications can be found on the city’s website, www.cityofcamas.us.To be considered, applications must be completed and received by the city staff at Camas City Hall, 616 N.E. Fourth Ave., by 5 p.m. Jan. 11. The council will hold a special meeting at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 15 to interview candidates and appoint a new councilor.last_img read more

With No Deal On Budget Legislative Session Goes Long

first_imgThe Alaska Legislature missed its adjournment deadline on Sunday night, after failing to reach agreement on the state’s budget. APRN’s Alexandra Gutierrez reports.It was certain by 8pm that the Legislature would not be gaveling out. A conference committee still had not met on the state’s operating budget, and the usual buzz and urgency of the last day of session was missing entirely.Taking a break outside the Capitol, House Speaker Mike Chenault explained the hold up was a vote to draw from the constitutional budget reserve to fill a multi-billion-dollar deficit. Without support from the Democratic minority, the Legislature is short at least three votes to tap the rainy day fund.“We get through it by negotiating with our minority on what they need to get out of here for a three-quarter vote,” said Chenault. “But yet, in turn, we’re not going to add millions of dollars back into the budget that we don’t agree with.”Making a deal of that scale is already hard enough, but compromise was further delayed by personal circumstances. That Sunday morning, the daughter of Democratic Minority Leader Chris Tuck and conservative talk radio personality Bernadette Wilson was born. Tuck flew back to Anchorage to meet the seven-pound Penelope Grace. Chenault, a Nikiski Republican, said that obviously could not be helped.“He’s got a new baby girl,” said Chenault. “It might have been not the right time, but he did what I would have done in his place. And I would have gone back and seen my wife and my child.”There are a few big sticking points in the negotiations. Democrats would like to see education funding restored, and they would like for the Legislature to expand Medicaid. They also want reverse some cuts to the ferry system, public broadcasting, and pre-kindergarten. Chenault says that if an agreement cannot be reached, a government shutdown is possible. “That’s not something we want to see with our state employees. I don’t believe that’s what the minority wants to see either,” said Chenault. “That’s, I guess, the nuclear option, if you want to call it that.”On the Senate side, Majority Leader John Coghill also spoke of dire consequences if a deal failed. The North Pole Republican said the Legislature could try to fund government using the permanent fund earnings reserve, which requires a simple majority instead of a three-quarter vote.“There’s a huge political reluctance to take that money, because it has huge impacts on the dividends,” said Coghill. “But I can tell you, that may be the very next thing we’ll have to do.”But House Democrats have objected to the compromise being described in such stark terms.“The permanent fund earnings is a deadly game,” said Rep. David Guttenberg, a Fairbanks Democrat. “If they’re going to play that game, I’m not going to participate in it.”Democrats believe their conditions for supporting a budget reserve draw should not come as a surprise.“We talked about Medicaid expansion and reform. We talked about education that doesn’t cut kids and opportunities. And we talked about seniors,” said Rep. Scott Kawasaki, a Fairbanks Democrat. “I mean we’ve talked about the same thing from the beginning.”Negotiations will continue Monday. While the legislative session is scheduled for 90 days by statute, the Alaska Constitution allows lawmakers to meet for 121 days without calling for a special session. Last year, the Legislature also gaveled out late, taking 95 days to complete their work.last_img read more

Cannabis deadline means beginning of applications but not sales

first_imgDownload AudioWednesday is an important date in the state’s long process of licensing commercial cannabis in Alaska: The deadline for the state to have a permit application up and running.(Marie Richie/Flickr)“From the stand-point of somebody that wants to go into the industry, February 24th is actually the starting point, it’s not a deadline at all, it’s really just the first date,” said Bruce Schulte, Chair of the state’s Marijuana Control Board.For anyone expecting to start buying cannabis products in stores, there are still many months to go before the start of legal sales.Though the state is required to start collecting applications, there are many regulations and rules that are not yet settled. For example, most local governments have not finalized their own laws for allowing prospective businesses.Schulte expects dozens of applications to be filed in the days ahead. Once an application is submitted, it kicks off an extensive vetting process of feedback from community councils, local governing bodies, and background checks of the applicant before going in front of the state’s Marijuana Control Board for review in June.According to Schulte, commercial sales may begin by late August under the current time-line. But that’s assuming municipal bodies like the Anchorage Assembly can iron out the details that are fundamental to industry regulation.“There’s still a lot of questions about what parts of town are open to this industry, and what properties are gonna be suitable,” Schulte said during a phone interview. “I think a lot of people are just gonna let the dust settle before they commit to a piece of property, because there’s a significant investment involved.”Schulte is himself one such applicant. A criteria for his position as an industry seat on the state’s Marijuana Control Board is a commercial interest in the emerging business. But even he sees the emerging regulatory framework across the state as a daunting prospect for investment at this time.“Being kind of a conservative guy in that way, I’m waiting to see how all the planets are going to align before I commit to a piece of property and a specific application,” Schulte said with a laugh.Tuesday night, the Anchorage Assembly voted on a revised zoning regulation with far-reaching implications for commercial cannabis businesses going forward. The body approved an amendment brought forward by downtown Assembly Member Patrick Flynn to a recently passed zoning ordinance that lays out how far cannabis businesses have to be from sensitive establishments like schools and playgrounds. In most of the municipality the distance will now be 500 feet, measured by the shortest pedestrian route. In the Chugiak-Eagle River area, however, a more restrictive 1,000 foot barrier will be assessed from lot-line to lot-line “as the crow flies.”The distinctions are part of an ongoing dispute over how restrictive a regulatory regime to adopt over commercial cannabis in the state’s largest city. Assembly members from the more conservative Chugiak-Eagle River district say they are representing the wishes of their constituents by pushing for tighter regulations over where retail shops, grow operations, and processing facilities can be located. But cannabis advocates and industry groups say the Assembly is zoning them out of existence. Adding that regulators are overwhelmed in advance of the deadline, Schulte recommended that questions about applications are best directed to the Marijuana Control Board’s website for now.last_img read more

Japan finally gets the 2DS arriving February in four Pokemon colors

first_imgIt’s unusual for Nintendo to ignore its home territory of Japan when releasing a new piece of gaming hardware, but that’s exactly what the company did when it released the 2DS back in October 2013. The surprise handheld was a rather unusual take on the 3DS, offering the same gaming experience minus the stereoscopic 3D feature and the hinge allowing the case to fold closed. However, what it did offer was a cheaper handheld, and one that wouldn’t easily break in the hands of a young child.Now the 2DS is finally making its way to Japan, and in four different colors no less. The excuse Nintendo has used to release the handheld at home is Pokemon. On February 26 next year Pokemon Red, Blue, Green, and Yellow will be released on the Virtual Console. To coincide with this, translucent red, blue, green, and yellow 2DS models will be launched in Japan. Each 2DS will ship with one of these Pokemon games pre-loaded. The game you get depends on the color 2DS chosen.As well as the pre-loaded game, Nintendo is including a special Home Menu theme, a poster, and a code to unlock Mew on any 3DS Pokemon game. A set of Pokemon stickers is also thrown in, which Nintendo encourages you to decorate the 2DS case with. There doesn’t seem to be any permanent Pokemon detail on the 2DS itself, although the outer box for each model will have a unique design. I also wouldn’t be surprised to see Nintendo release a Pokemon-themed carry case and maybe stylus sets.Translucent cases are not a new thing for the 2DS, Nintendo already released the blue and red versions across Europe last year to coincide with the launch of Pokemon Omega Ruby and Pokemon Alpha Sapphire. This is the first time we are seeing green and yellow versions, though, and hopefully they head to western markets.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – Evidence of quarkgluon interactions new portable device

first_img In news of a completely different nature, researchers discovered a hack that allows access to personal data on Windows, Android and iOS devices—in testing they found they could access the devices between 82 and 92 percent of the time, which meant they were able to hack the accounts of services used on those devices, and frustratingly, there doesn’t appear to be a way to block it. In other scary news, a team of researchers in Denmark has found a link between the common antibiotic clarithromycin and heart deaths—it’s used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections.More optimistically, a group working at Michigan State University has found a way to create a new type of solar collector that doesn’t block the view—because it’s clear. And if you’ve been wondering why global warming is taking a break, a team in Switzerland thinks it’s because of El Niño/La Niña and solar fluctuations. And finally, if you were hoping to be part of the generation of people that live forever, you may be out of luck as a team of researchers has concluded that living forever may never be possible—sadly, they think they’ve found evidence that we humans have reached a plateau. Explore further Citation: Best of Last Week – Evidence of quark-gluon interactions, new portable device hack and why we may never live forever (2014, August 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-week-evidence-quark-gluon-interactions-portable.html Researchers find first direct evidence of ‘spin symmetry’ in atoms (Phys.org) —With summer drawing to a close, research is starting to heat up. Last week, physicists at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider used supercomputer calculations to offer evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions are being produced in heavy-ion collisions—it’s the first such evidence found and it should offer scientists a way to mimic condition that existed 14 billion years ago. Also, researchers at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics in Denver Colorado have found the first direct evidence of “spin symmetry” in atoms. The team used an ultra-stable laser and their findings could lead to a better understanding of superconductivity and colossal magneto-resistance. Meanwhile, another team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory demonstrated ultra low-field nuclear magnetic resonance using Earth’s magnetic field—it was a proof of concept experiment looking into ways to sense the interior chemical and physical attributes of an object from a distance, without sampling or encapsulating it. And in another first, physicists at Yale University have succeeded in chilling the world’s coolest molecules—they cooled samples of strontium monofluoride, to 2.5 thousandths of a degree above absolute zero using a laser isolating and cooling process—it’s the lowest temperature ever achieved by scientists for a molecule.center_img © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This is an illustration of symmetry in the magnetic properties — or nuclear ‘spins’ — of strontium atoms. JILA researchers observed that if two atoms have the same nuclear spin state (top), they interact weakly, and the interaction strength does not depend on which of the 10 possible nuclear spin states are involved. If the atoms have different nuclear spin states (bottom), they interact much more strongly, and, again, always with the same strength. Credit: Ye and Rey groups and Steve Burrows/JILAlast_img read more

Class 6 student found dead in boarding school foul play suspected

first_imgDarjeeling: The death of a class 6 student in a school hostel has shaken Darjeeling. The family of the deceased, suspecting foul play has lodged a complaint at the Darjeeling police station. Along with the police investigation, a Magisterial inquest was also conducted.The incident occurred on Friday evening and an autopsy was conducted on Sunday The boarders of Good Start Academy in Darjeeling found a fellow boarder, Aditya Raj, hanging from the bunker bed in his hostel room. A towel was draped around his neck. He was still breathing after his school teachers brought him down. He was immediately rushed to Darjeeling Sadar Hospital where he was declared brought dead. Dipak Kumar, father of the deceased stated that Aditya was admitted to Class 6 in Good Start Academy, Darjeeling on July 16. The family hails from Vivekananda Colony, Begampur Chowk, Patna. “After he took admission, we left Darjeeling on July 16. On July 20 evening, we received a call stating that my son tried to commit suicide and we were immediately asked to come to Darjeeling. We started for Darjeeling on road,” stated Dipak Kumar. On reaching Darjeeling on Saturday morning, the school authorities stated that Aditya was no more. “We saw the spot where the school authorities claim that Aditya had hung himself. We do not believe that he committed suicide seeing the height of the spot,” claimed Dipak Kumar. The family members have lodged a complaint at the Darjeeling Sadar police station. “On Saturday, we received a complaint from the parents. We have initiated a murder case based on the complaint. Police are investigating. The body has been sent to North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, Siliguri for an autopsy. The hospital authorities are seeking specialized help as well. We are awaiting the reports,” stated Amarnath K, Superintendent of Police (Operation), Darjeeling. “A magisterial inquest was also conducted. Along with a ligature mark on the neck, external bruises in the body were also seen. We have handed over our report,” stated Avik Chatterjee, SDO, Darjeeling. The school authorities were not available for comments. The school earlier known as Good Start Montessori School is located in Chandmari, Darjeeling. The school founded in 1980 has classes from Play Group to Class 8.last_img read more

read more

first_imgFind more SCCT news and videos Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Recent Videos View all 606 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting.center_img Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Find more SCCT news and videos Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports View all 9 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Videos | March 22, 2011 GE Innova Used for Emergency Embolization Procedure Without CT Imaging Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Prashant Patel, M.D., St. Lukeâ??s Hospital and Health Network, Bethleham, Pa., explains a case where he uses GE’s Innova for an arteriogram, embolization and cystography in a single session for a trauma case. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatmentslast_img read more