Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government announces Fall 2016 fellows

first_imgAmong the senior fellows being welcomed this fall to the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government (M-RCBG) at the Harvard Kennedy School are a former Special Assistant to the President at the National Economic Council and the National Security Council, and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Treasury; a former Deputy Comptroller of the Currency with a career focused on consumer financial protection; an expert in strategic consulting to boards of directors; the head of a solar energy development and investment firm and former New England Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; the Head of Climate Finance and Senior Manager on the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Change Support Team; and the former Chief of Staff in the Office of the CEO of the International Finance Corporation (“IFC”).“Senior fellows are a vital resource to our center. They bring valuable experience as practitioners, and their strong academic orientation enables them to provide significant insights.  In sum, their work here enriches our understanding of the business-government relationship,” said Richard Zeckhauser, Frank Plumpton Ramsey Professor of Political Economy and chair of M-RCBG’s fellows selection committee.The Senior Fellows Program is designed to strengthen the connection between theory and practice as the center examines and develops policies at the intersection of business and government.  Every senior fellow is sponsored by a Harvard faculty member.  During their time at M-RCBG, they undertake a substantial research project and offer a study group for students.last_img read more

Students reflect on summer service program

first_imgEight Saint Mary’s seniors gathered in Carroll Auditorium on Monday night to discuss their experiences living in Uganda with the Sisters of the Holy Cross and working in the Moreau Nursery and Primary School and the Kyembogo Holy Cross Health Centre. Their travels were part of the College’s Uganda Summer Practicum, which brings nursing and education majors together for six weeks in the Toro kingdom and exposes them to the culture of the Kyarusozi community and the core values of the Sisters of the Holy Cross.Senior nursing majors Allison Campbell, Madison Carmichael, Therese Dudro and Jovita Lledo Munoz, along with senior elementary education majors Anna McClowry, Katie Price, Megan Shea and Katherine Soper shared their memories from the 2017 Practicum.McClowry said participating in the program helped her hone valuable skills, such as establishing a teaching schedule, collaborating with the other teachers and writing lesson plans the day before class.“You kind of have to get creative,” she said. “There are some days when you’re exhausted and overwhelmed, but when you walk into a classroom, and you have kids smiling at you, it honestly makes your heart smile. The students and teachers are really, really appreciative of all your work there, so just know that your presence is enough in those times that you feel exhausted or overwhelmed.”Dudro said students working at the Kyembogo Holy Cross Health Centre helped with outpatient care, inpatient care and lab tests. Most of the 20 inpatient beds, she said, were filled by patients who had contracted malaria.“Unfortunately for them, [malaria] is kind of like the common cold here,” she said.  “Everyone gets malaria. It can be really serious. We saw some people that were in critical condition, some young children, and it was really scary to see them so sick.”Prices said she felt an overwhelming sense of community while working.“The first thing [the sisters] do when you arrive is make sure that you have that sense of home,” Price said. “I remember … we pulled up in the van after traveling for five hours that day … and Sister Lillian came out, helped us with our bags and the first thing that she said was, ‘Welcome home.’ You knew right then that you were going to be taken care of and well-loved.”Daily mass and regular prayer helped students embrace the four core values of compassion, faith, prayer and community, Soper said.“Their faith life is unbelievable,” she said. “It is quite an opportunity to be able to live with the Sisters of the Holy Cross and in their community. You are right there with them. You are living out their faith life with them, and you are on that journey to Heaven with them.”Tags: education, nursing, Sisters of the Holy Cross, Uganda Summer Practicumlast_img read more

‘Tisoy’ slightly weakens after several landfalls

first_imgPhoto from earth.nullschool.net Tisoy is expected to pass south of Metro Manila and reach 615 kms west of Subic, Zambales on Thursday morning to leave the Philippine area of responsibility as a severe tropical storm. Airport authorities also announced the cancellation of some flights for Tuesday and Wednesday, due to bad weather. The Ninoy Aquino International Airport suspended its operations until 11 p.m. last night. Storm surges of up to three meters may hit coastal areas in Batangas, Marinduque, Mindoro Provinces, Romblon, and Cavite, Estareja said. MANILA – Typhoon “Tisoy” (international name: Kammuri) has gradually weakened after making several landfalls in southern Luzon, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said on Tuesday. Some of the games of the 30th SoutheastAsian Games were also postponed./PN PAGASA weather specialist Benison Estareja said in a press conference that Tisoy is now heading to the Mindoro provinces, where it is set to hit land, moving west at 25 kilometers per hour (kph). Overnight, Tisoy battered various provinces in Luzon and Visayas. Houses were damaged, trees fell, and cellphone signals were down in some areas. As part of safety measures, classes for Tuesday and Wednesday were canceled in affected areas. The eye of the typhoon was last seen 55 kilometers east of Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro, packing maximum winds of 150 kilometer per hour and gusts of up to 205 kilometer per hours. The typhoon first made a landfall on Monday evening in Gubat, Sorsogon, followed by another land hit in San Pascual, Burias Island early Tuesday, and in Torrijos, Marinduque at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. Malacañang suspended work in government offices and classes in all levels in Metro Manila beginning Tuesday noon due to bad weather brought by Typhoon Tisoy. last_img read more

Port of Olympia Appoints Sam Gibboney as Executive Director

first_imgFacebook10Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Port of OlympiaThe Port of Olympia Commission is proud to announce the appointment of Sam Gibboney as its new Executive Director. Gibboney brings years of executive experience in community development, public works and environmental leadership to her new role. Most recently, Gibboney was Executive Director of the Port of Port Townsend where she provided strategic and operational management, of an 18-acre ship yard, three marinas, an international general aviation airport and a campus of historical buildings. “I’m excited for the opportunity to lead an organization with such significant economic impact,” said Sam Gibboney. “I look forward to joining the Port of Olympia team and getting to know the Thurston County community.”Gibboney joins the organization at a critical time in the comprehensive planning process. The Port adopted a Strategic Plan in 2017. Through the extensive planning and discussion, the Port Commission reaffirmed its commitment to serving as a change agent and leader in the following areas; creating economic opportunities, acting as an environmental steward, and creating and maintaining community assets. Gibboney will be expected to move the Port toward the ultimate goal: A More Resilient Thurston County. In addition, as the Port approaches its 100 year anniversary, the Port is currently underway with Vision 2050. The Executive Director will be instrumental in moving this, community focused visioning process soliciting input from citizens of Thurston County on the future of the Port in the next 30 years, forward.“The Commission strived for a great public servant to lead our organization with transparency and strong values,” said Commission President E.J. Zita. “We are thrilled to have Sam’s experience and leadership as we progress and change.”The Commission selected Gibboney following an extensive recruitment effort that included outreach to the community via an on-line survey, a public and an employee forum. Candidates from around the region and across the country were reviewed as part of the selection process.Gibboney, 57, will start work on January 22, 2019. She will be paid $175,000 a year.last_img read more

Essential Workers Share What Keeps Them Coming To Work

first_imgNew to the role, Johnsonhas been asked to take onmore than most employeesduring their first year onthe job. When asked if shestill wanted to continue topursue nursing, she did nothesitate in her response.“Even though these timesare so hard, I’ve never seenthis kind of teamwork. It’s adifferent set of stakes. You’retalking about people’s lives.Everybody is just trying todo the best they can for theirpatients,” she said. In addition to filling medication requests, Stryker explained that his staff also plays a vital role in providing information. He reports pharmacy staff spend a large portion of each day fielding questions from the community. In Atlantic Highlands, Richard P. Stryker and Scott Eagleton have kept Bayshore Pharmacy open seven days a week, delivering medication right to their customers’ homes. Stryker’s father, Richard C. Stryker, opened the pharmacy in 1964, and the family has served the community for over 50 years. Their newest store, Middletown Family Pharmacy in Belford, remains open as well for curbside pickup. “The best thing I’ve seen throughout this event is, without a doubt, people helping people. At the end of the day, it’ll be the regular people who help everyone make it through this.” “The neighborhood reallyrelies on us. Someone has tobe here. I’d rather it be methan someone else and mypartner is the same way,” heexplained. “At least, with the stormswe lost power, but we knewthey were working to get thatback. Everyone was going tobe OK.” He added that in thissituation, though the lightsare on, everyone is still atrisk. “That’s the terrifyingpart of it. It’s the part thatmakes us nervous.” Pulling off the parkway on a Friday night, the gas station is one of the few businesses with the lights on, though there are no other cars at the pump. Inside, three workers stood a moderate distance apart, with no masks. Thanking them for being able to provide me gas between shifts, I asked if they were scared. They said yes. They told me they know they need to stay open, but they are worried, considered essential when most people are under a strict stay-at-home order from Gov. Phil Murphy because of the COVID-19 outbreak. “The reason we’re staying open is first and foremost we’re part of the community,” he said. “As long as we’re helping the community, we’ll stay open.” Bain proudly explained that he views his store as “neighbors serving neighbors.” “We’re all in the same community, and we have to take care of each other, and that’s what do,” he said. Jamie Jablonowski, BSN, RN, CIC is a registered nurse and public health professional living in Sea Bright She added, “What scares me the most is seeing doctors and nurses terrified to go to work. They see illness and death on a regular basis and aren’t easily frightened.” While health care workers tend to the sick, other essential businesses help keep the community navigating through a new way of life. Frank Bain, owner of Bain’s Hardware Store in Sea Bright has been in business for 25 years. “Nobody alive has ever seen anything like this,” he said. When asked about the distance she needed to travel and the risk involved, she said, “I’m doing this because it needs to be done. Some people can help by just staying home. I can help by going where I’m needed. Simple as that.” Tiffany Johnson of Monmouth Beach is a student at Brookdale Community College, completing prerequisites for nursing school. Four months ago, she decided to take a role as a unit secretary on a fast-paced medical-surgical floor in a hospital. She echoed similar reports of limited personal protective equipment (PPE) and resources as the hospital census of coronavirus patients grows. Bain’s Hardware Store provides everything from plumbing and painting supplies to much sought after puzzles. His store also serves as the village post office. While many are staying in, essential workers head out each day, facing not only the coronavirus but the responsibility of providing services to a community that is now dependent on their presence more than ever. As the daily reports of illness and fatalities continue to grow, what keeps essential workers showing up? Several men and women who have been working since the beginning of the pandemic share their answers: Lauren Fonseca, a registered nurse from Oceanport, is currently working at a testing site in New York. Each week, she takes multiple trains to Long Island. This week she worked several back-to-back shifts, but didn’t forget to pick up toilet paper for her family before making the trek back home. Stryker views his role as making sure his patients are as comfortable as possible. He explained his team works hard to make sure their customers have refills of their medications available. “It relieves stress when they know they are going to get what they need,” he said. Tiffany Johnson donned PPE she is required to wear fo the entirety of her 16-hour shift. Richard P. Stryker said the pandemic draws some parallels to the large storms the community has experienced in the past such as SuperStorm Sandy, but that this situation feels more precarious. While all those interviewed shared similar sentiments of teamwork and community, Fonseca summarized it best. This article originally appeared in the April 9th, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. By Jamie Jablonowski “I can’t stay on the sidelines,” said Johnson. “Although it’s scary, there’s nothing like being able to help people that are in need of it. It feels good to be doing something positive in a time where there’s so much uncertainty.” last_img read more