Fireworks expected at National Stadium

first_img HOT HURDLES Local track and field fans are in for a treat today as several of the world’s top athletes will be on show at the Jamaica International Invitational (JII) meet inside the National Stadium. The main events are set to get under way at 7:30 p.m. with the women’s 400 metres hurdles, one of 19 international events. However, action will start as early as 2 p.m. with one of two new events on the programme, the international hammer throw for women. The other new event, the men’s international javelin begins at 4:15 p.m. These will be followed by six Development events, starting at 5:05 p.m. with the women’s 100 metres. The final event of the night, the women’s 400 metres at 9:23, should be one of the most competitive. Jamaica’s trio of Stephenie Ann McPherson, who was third last year, along with Novlene Williams-Mills, fourth a year ago, and Christine Day, who was fifth, will be hoping for a local sweep of the top three places following the withdrawal of last year’s winner, American Sanya Richards-Ross. The Jamaicans will come up against another American, Francena McCorory, runner-up last year and winner of the event two years ago. This event is expected to be a cracker as, fresh in the minds of fans is last year’s World Championships 4×400 metres final in Beijing, when Williams-Mills outwitted McCorory on the anchor leg to give Jamaica a memorable win. With a good record here over the years, Williams-Mills will be hoping to get back to winning ways. POWELL IN 200m The women’s 100m hurdles at 8:27 p.m. should also be hot. World champion Danielle Williams will be engaged in a very tough battle against some fierce rivals. Last year’s winner Jasmin Stowers is out, but her compatriots Sharika Nelvis, American record holder Brianna Rollins (12.26), and 2008 Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson will be hoping for a top three sweep. Also in the event is Britain’s record holder Tiffany Porter (12.51). “I am under no pressure whatsoever as I am going into the race to have fun, and if you want to be the best, you have to beat the best,” Jamaica’s Williams said in a recent interview. Elaine Thompson and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will be hoping to make it a great night for local fans when they compete in the 100 and 200 metres, respectively. American Tori Bowie ran a world-leading 10.80 seconds in winning the women’s 100 metres at the Doha Diamond League meet yesterday, and Thompson, who won a year ago with 10.97, will be hoping to go faster here. English Gardener of the United States is her main rival. Fraser-Pryce, who was third in this event a year ago, will face the outstanding Shaunae Miller of the Bahamas. Miller was impressive in clocking a Bahamian and meet-record 22.14 in the half-lap event last year and is this year’s world leader in the 400m with a 49.69 run on April 16 in Nassau. Fraser-Pryce will be joined by countrywoman Shericka Jackson, who was a bronze medallist in the 400m at last year’s World Championships. Also down to compete is rising American sprinter Candice McGrone. Former world 100m record holder Asafa Powell is down for the 200m where he will face local rival Rasheed Dwyer. In the men’s 100 m Julian Forte, Kemar Bailey Cole and Oshane Bailey will carry Jamaican hopes against the very fast Americans Tyson Gay and Mike Rodgers. SELECTED EVENTS 7 p.m. Shot put women – International 7.03 p.m. Triple jump men – International 7.06 p.m. 3000m steeplechase men – International 7:30 p.m. 400m hurdles women – International 7:37 p.m. 400m hurdles men – International 7:40 p.m. High jump men – International. 7:49 p.m. 800m men – International 8 p.m. 1500m women – International 8:07 p.m. Long jump women – International 8:11 p.m. 100m women – International 8:15 p.m. 100m men – International 8:27 p.m. 100m hurdles women – International 8:37 p.m. 110m men – International 8:53 p.m. 200m women – International 9:03 p.m. 200m men – International 9:14 p.m. 400m men – International 9:23 p.m. 400m women – Internationallast_img read more

1950s chart-topper Laine dies of heart failure at 93

first_imgHe sold more than 100 million records and earned more than 20 gold records. Laine said his musical influences included Bing Crosby, Al Jolson and a goodly number of jazz artists, such as Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong and Billie Holliday. “When people nowadays say that Elvis was the first white guy to sound black, I have to shake my head; what can you do?” he said in a 1987 interview. “At the time of `That’s My Desire,’ they were saying that I was the only white guy around who sounded black.” Laine’s variety show, “Frankie Laine Time,” ran for two summers, 1955 and 1956, on CBS, and he also appeared in a number of films, including “When You’re Smiling,” and “Sunny Side of the Street.” Laine was born Frank LoVecchio on March 30, 1913, in Chicago, the son of a barber who emigrated from Sicily. He struggled from his teens until well into his 30s – even having to earn a living as a marathon dancer – before hits began coming his way with “That’s My Desire” in 1947. His breakthrough came when Hoagy Carmichael heard him sing in a Los Angeles nightclub and praised his work. In recent years, he remained active in touring and in charity fundraising. He was married to Nan Grey, a leading lady in Hollywood films of the 1930s who died in 1993. Laine is survived by his second wife, Marcia; brother, Phillip LoVecchio of Chicago; daughter, Pamela Donner; grandsons, Joshua and David Donner of Los Angeles; and daughter and son-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Irwin Steiger of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Frankie Laine, the big-voiced singer whose string of hits made him one of the most popular entertainers in the 1950s, died Tuesday. He was 93. Laine died of heart failure at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, Jimmy Marino, Laine’s producer of more than a dozen years, told The Associated Press. “He was one of the greatest singers around,” Marino said. “He was one of the last Italian crooners type.” With songs such as “That’s My Desire,” “Mule Train,” “Jezebel,” “I Believe” and “That Lucky Old Sun,” Laine was a regular feature of the Top Ten in the years just before rock ‘n’ roll ushered in a new era of popular music. Somewhat younger listeners may remember him best for singing the theme to the television show “Rawhide,” which ran from 1959 to 1966, and the theme for the 1974 movie “Blazing Saddles.” last_img