Network for Good DonateNow Lite versus PayPal

first_imgNeed to start online fundraising? Have you checked out PayPal or Google Checkout?It’s time to consider a better (but still free!) solution. Network for Good provides a free online fundraising service to registered 501(c)3 organizations — DonateNow Lite.How does DonateNow Lite compare to Paypal?Donor experience is heightened because of Network for Good’s use of a donation form (rather than a shopping cart).Donors receive automated tax receipts and online donation history.You can accept recurring donations.You can track donations with online reports.Our service is registered to process donations for nonprofits from the residents of all 50 states + DC — PayPal is not. (While Network for Good is a registered charity in all requiring states, we recommend that you also seek professional advice for your unique situation in complying with applicable laws governing charitable appeals in the respective states.)Network for Good is a nonprofit like you are.We offer our subscribers free fundraising training & resources at www.fundraising123.org.Don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions!last_img read more

Must read: the changing US consumer

first_imgThere is a great piece in Advertising Age online today from Peter Francese, founder of American Demographics magazine (registration required to view the article). He writes about the changing face of consumers. Like me, they’re getting more wrinkly and set in their ways by the day.Here are a couple of the highlights (warning: sweeping generalizations ahead), along with thoughts on the implications for us. You can read the full article here (with registration).OLDER: A full 80% of the growth in US households in the next five years will be from those headed by people over age 55. Yep, that’s right — EIGHTY PERCENT. The average age of the US household is already only six months shy of 50. The first boomers hit 65 in less than three years. So what does that mean? The older set (65+), says Francese, tend to be risk adverse and inflexible in their attitudes. That means clever marketers will play to this world view with messaging about guarantees, safety and experience. Warranties, corporate history and testimonials work. So, nonprofit marketers, emphasize your organization’s storied history and great performance with these folks. Don’t be too cute or flashy. Meanwhile, the second fastest growing segment is folks 25-34 – a group that is increasingly diverse ethnically. The bigggest spending, best paid group — those 35 to 54 – is shrinking. Groan.ALL OVER THE PLACE, IN EVERY SENSE OF THE EXPRESSION: As you read this, I suspect you’re having the reaction that I did – sheesh, how are you supposed to reach such different groups? It gets even more challenging when you consider geographic segments. The West is getting younger and more multicultural while the Northeast is getting older and whiter. (I told you there would be generalizations – this is demographics, after all.) The answer? Segmentation of course. You’re going to need different positioning for different audiences — AND different message delivery vehicles. The latter is actually good news – it’s easier to target your message when not everyone is getting your messages the same way and when people are clustered into certain locations. There are people who live online and on their phones, and there are folks who stick to the newspaper. You need to look not only at the age of your audiences, but also where and how they live so you know the best way to reach them. Fancy marketers call this ethnographic research. Throw that into your next convo to look extra smart.last_img read more

Write for Fundraising123!

first_imgNetwork for Good welcomes submissions of bylined contributions from guest authors. If you are interested in joining our more than 100 contributors on a one-time or regular basis, here are some guidelines:Articles should be original material that hasn’t been published previously. Include your byline, a brief bio (no more than 25 words) and links to other writing or presentation samples (if available). We do not publish author photos.Articles should offer readers clear tips, ideas advice or take-aways about online fundraising and/or marketing. Bullet points are good. Short and pithy is good.Submissions may be edited for style, clarity or length.Copyright is retained by the writer. although we prefer work that is licensed under a Creative Commons license. With a Creative Commons license, you keep your copyright but allow people to copy and distribute your work provided they give you credit — and only on the conditions you specify.We do not pay guest contributors for articles.Due to the volume of submissions we receive, we regret that we are unable to publish all works submitted.If interested in pitching an article idea, please contact us at [email protected]last_img read more

Alliance of Artists Communities: Emerging Program Institute

first_imgOn February 16, 2009, I had the honor to present at the 2009 Emerging Program Institute at the McColl Center for Visual Art in Charlotte, NC.  At the bottom of this article are a PDF copy of the slides for this presentation. In addition, I’ve included some of my favorite articles from here in the Network for Good Learning Center. Enjoy!Favorite Articles10 Things to Avoid in Email Campaigns11 Steps to Success with Social Networking33 Ideas that Change the Fundraising Game4 Basic Website Tweaks5 Elements of a Good Story9 Email Do’s and Don’ts for the SenderBring Your e-Newsletter from Snoring to SoaringCreate an Online Fundraising Plan – Step 1: Work Your WebsiteCreate an Online Fundraising Plan – Step 2: Evolve Your EmailsCreate an Online Fundraising Plan – Step 3: Match Up Your Online and Offline MarketingCreate an Online Fundraising Plan – Step 4: Know Your NumbersDeveloping a Strategic Communications Plan Eight Things Your Home Page Must HaveEmail Signatures: A Missed Marketing OpportunityFive Deadly Sins of Website DesignHow to Ask for DonationsReport: Can donation page optimization boost online giving?Sample Online Fundraising PlanShould You Send Emails to Supporters via Outlook?The Secret to Getting People to Give: 15 Reasons Why People Donate To Increase Charitable Donations, Appeal to the Heart — Not the Headlast_img read more

New report: Green is in, but trust in green claims is tenuous

first_imgBBMG’s second annual Conscious Consumer Report is out. The national study on purchasing behavior and social values is available here. Below are highlights from the report, provided by BBMG. They sound about right to me – there is a lot of skepticism about all marketing claims these days. And this is further proof that Wal-Mart has done quite a job turning around national opinion thanks to some high-profile moves to be more socially responsible.Consumers Like Green, but Are Skeptical of Corporate Claims. Nearly one in four U.S. consumers (23%) say they have “no way of knowing” if a product is green or actually does what it claims, signaling a lack of confidence in green marketing and revealing a widespread “green trust gap.” But consumers’ lack of trust does not mean lack of interest. The BBMG report finds that 77 percent of Americans agree that they “can make a positive difference by purchasing products from socially or environmentally responsible companies,” and they are actively seeking information to verify green claims. Consumers are most likely to turn to consumer reports (29%), certification seals or labels on products (28%) and the list of ingredients on products (27%) to determine if a product is green and does what it claims. Consumers are least likely to look to statements on product packaging (11%) and company advertising (5%), signaling deep skepticism of company-driven marketing. Interest in Green Holds Despite Tough Economy. Nearly seven in ten Americans agree (67%) that “even in tough economic times, it is important to purchase products with social and environmental benefits,” and half (51%) say they are “willing to pay more” for them.Price and Performance Still Paramount, But Green Gains Ground. Price (66% very important) and quality (64%) top consumers’ list of most important product attributes, followed by good for your health (55%) and made in the USA (49%). But green benefits have increased in importance since last year – including energy efficiency (47% very important in 2008, 41% in 2007), locally grown or made nearby (32% in 2008, 26% in 2007), all natural (31% in 2008, 24% in 2007), made from recycled materials (29% in 2008, 22% in 2007) and USDA organic (22% in 2008, 17% in 2007).Wal-Mart Tops List of Most and Least Socially Responsible Companies. When asked unaided which companies come to mind as the most socially or environmentally responsible companies, 7 percent of Americans named Wal-Mart, followed by Johnson & Johnson (6%), Procter & Gamble (4%), GE (4%) and Whole Foods (3%). Wal-Mart also topped the list of the least responsible companies (9%), along with Exxon Mobile (9%), GM (3%) and Ford (3%), Shell (2%) and McDonald’s (2%). Interestingly, 41% of Americans could not name a single company that they consider the most socially and environmentally responsible.Consumers Reward, Punish and Influence Based on Corporate Practices. Seven in ten consumers (71%) agree that they “avoid purchasing from companies whose practices they disagree with”; and approximately half tell others to shop (55%) or drop (48%) products based on a company’s social and environmental practices.last_img read more